A Cooperative Effort

 

There are almost as many ways to make rum as there are to drink it. No one technique better than the other, the means and methods dictated by artistic discretion of the distiller. We wanted to celebrate the various rum making traditions by bringing them together into one transcendent expression. We hope you enjoy drinking it as much as we've enjoyed making it. 

 
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Panama

45% of the blend

Together, the rums from Panama and the Dominican Republic occupy the middle ground of the blend, providing a foundation for the bigger rums. At the same time, they also add a distinctive fruitiness, as well as soft notes of oak and leather.

Notes of: concentrated cane juice, american oak

 
 
 

Dominican

36% of the blend

This rum provides a backbone to the blend, balancing and harmonizing the fuller bodied rums from Jamaica and Trinidad, and rounding out the mid-palate. Rum from the Dominican Republic tends to be lighter bodied and delicate. If rum from the West Indies represents the more robust end of the flavor spectrum, Dominican rum represents the more muted, subtle end of the spectrum. It is, in a lot of ways, reminiscent of the lighter bodied brandies produced by the Spanish immigrants who settled the island.

Notes of: honey, crème brûlée

 
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Boston

10% of the blend

Our eight year Boston rum supplements the funky notes imparted by the Jamaican rum. It's distinctive flavor and aroma adds nuance, contributing an additional layer to the patchwork. 

Boston’s history of rum distillation dates back to the 1600s. Due to the triangle trade, whereby slaves from West Africa were sent to the West Indies, molasses from the west indies was sent to Boston, and rum from Boston was sent back to West Africa, Boston became one of the preeminent rum distilling cities.

During the height of the boom, there were 63 rum distilleries in Boston, and it was one of the largest industries in New England. By all accounts, the rum distilled in Boston was not good, but it was distinctive. Boston rum has come a long way, and a dedicated group of distilleries has built upon and elevated the city's reputation for making good rum.

Notes of: toasted nuts, caramelized fruits

 
 

Trinidad

8.1% OF THE BLEND

The rum we sourced from Trinidad is a classic example of rum typically made in the British West Indies. It’s rich and complex, with a natural sweetness and fruitiness that's particular to the region.  On the spectrum of rum flavor, it's less funky and more rich than Jamaican rum. It's richness is great for adding depth, mouthfeel, and a prolonged, silky finish. 

Notes of: fruit, brandy-like aromas

 
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Jamaica

0.9% of the blend

Jamaican rums are renowned for their funkiness — and we mean funky in the best way. They're big and robust.  In the parlance of the rum distiller, they are "Cogener heavy," congeners being the chemical compounds that add complexity to rum. The distinctive flavor of Jamaican rum is achieved, in part, through the use of  "dunder."  When the rum distillation is complete, the slurry that's left over, "dunder", is pumped into a pit, where it’s left to sit. It's then added into subsequent fermentations, contributing to the formation of what are called "esters."

If you are aiming for a funky rum, the more esters that form the better because esters contribute to congener development. When crafting a rum blend, a little Jamaican rum goes a long way. This blend uses just the right amount to add mystique and depth, without taking over the profile of the finished product.

Notes of: summer rum-punch, banana, Pineapple, and Oranges